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CAMP LEJEUNE WATER CONTAMINATION LAWYERS

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If You Lived, Worked, Or Were Exposed To Toxic Water at Camp Lejeune May Be Entitled To Compensation.

Veterans from the United States who drank the tainted water at Camp Lejeune can now sue the government for damages tied to

Camp Lejeune Water Lawyer

Water Pollution At Camp Lejeune Linked To Breast Cancer

Federal scientists studying contamination in the Lejeune, N.C., drinking water Camp Lejeune, N.C., USA, said in a new study that they found a possible link between contaminants and cases of men’s breast cancer in men living on the Marine Corps base in Lejeune. Epidemiological data from outside the Camp Lejeune Base have concluded that breast cancer may be linked to exposure to chlorinated solvents (PCE and TCE) in Camp Lejeune’s water supply. In addition, results from a water model indicate a possible association between exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE), DCE, and vinyl chloride in the Camp Lejeune water supply and male breast cancer.

An earlier beginning of male breast cancer was associated with permanent residence at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune and higher cumulative exposures to trichloroethylene (TCE), PCE, DCE, and vinyl chloride. Risk ratios ranged from 1.4 to 2.7, with large confidence intervals for the total combined exposure variables. Another study by CDC focused exclusively on cases of breast cancer among men exposed to TCE, Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and vinyl chloride from Camp Lejeune, N.C. Although ATSDRs research looked at prostate and breast cancer linked to contaminated Camp Lejeune water, those were not on a list of presumptively service-related cancers. The results from the ATSDR studies also suggest a correlation between exposure levels in the groundwater at Lejeune and breast cancer rates.

The study also showed that exposure to contaminated water did not just lead to kidney cancer but to other chronic kidney diseases. Additionally, exposure to pollutants like benzene and trichloroethylene from contaminated water is known to raise the risk of liver cancer. Compounds discovered in Camp Lejeune’s tainted water may have caused various types of cancer, according to data from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

The Act lists several types of diseases that can be linked to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune, including childhood leukemia and cancers of the kidneys, lungs, bladder, and breast. In addition, studies by DOD and others have shown that those exposed to the toxic substances in Camp Lejeune areas are at a higher risk for developing several health problems, including various types of cancer. As a result, ATSDR is now conducting an epidemiological cancer survey to determine if pollution is associated with higher rates of certain types of cancer.

The ASTDR study notes that marines and Navy personnel deployed between 1975 and 1985 had a higher risk of death for all types of cancers than those not exposed to the contaminated waters at Camp Pendleton. For example, one study found that Marines on active duty from 1975 to 1985 had a ten percent higher risk of dying of cancer than US Marines who served at Camp Pendleton. At this military base, no contaminated water was present. In addition, Marines, families, and employees subjected to PCE, or both PCE and TCE – the two significant contaminants of Camp Lejeune’s drinking water – had a higher risk of developing bladder cancer. 

Will Suing Have An Impact On VA Benefits For Camp Lejeune Water?

Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Claimants may claim VA compensation and medical benefits by filing with the Department of Veterans Affairs a claim for disability compensation and providing specific documentation supporting the claim. The VA encourages all Camp Lejeune veterans and their loved ones experiencing other health problems that they think are related to the water contamination to file a claim. Veterans and their families who suffered after being exposed to the polluted water at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeunesuffered severe medical conditions, as a result, are already entitled to receive disability from the VA. Even if a person receives public benefits for a medical condition or disability related to the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune, they may still file a claim under the Fairness Act.

Veterans can still retain their VA disability benefits even if they are awarded damages as part of the lawsuit against the Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base. If they received VA compensation for conditions connected to Camp Lejeune, or if Medicare or Medicaid paid for any associated medical expenses, then any money they get in the lawsuit will be adjusted by the amounts of those benefits. In addition to VA benefits, people affected by toxic bases waters can now be eligible for a Camp Lejeune Settlement, a separate compensation award from the lawsuit. Suppose you are receiving VA benefits presently for a service-connected injury suffered on Camp Lejeune. In that case, an offset will be made in your compensation, payments, or benefits, depending on the type of disability award.

Depending on your disability rating, you may be able to claim higher levels of compensation. For example, a veteran with Parkinson’s, adult leukemia, non-Hodgkins Lymphoma, or another disease related to the contaminated Camp Lejeune waters can obtain VA disability benefits on top of any compensation available through the litigation associated with the toxic exposure.

The Camp Lejeune Fairness Act does not affect the veterans eligible for VA disability benefits. However, it could open up another path for obtaining compensation for the injuries caused by exposure to contaminated drinking water. The Honor, Our PACT Act represents the most significant expansion in benefits available for veterans exposed to toxic substances in decades. It allows victims of water contamination at the Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune to pursue monetary compensation. In addition, the Honoring Our PACT Act of 2022 allows affected individuals to receive immediate compensation for the damages caused by the contaminated waters. 

Which Veterans’ Benefits Are Offered To Camp Lejeune Victims?

VA medical care and Camp Lejeune disability benefits can be provided to affected veterans and their families as long as they fit the criteria listed above. For example, veterans who served at the Camp or MCAS New River were not dishonorably discharged and had at least one of the presumptive VA conditions could qualify for VA disability benefits due to Camp Lejeune water contamination. Camp Lejeune water pollution applicants may claim VA disability compensation and medical benefits by filing a claim for disability compensation with the Department of Veterans Affairs and providing specific documentation supporting their claim. In addition, under the Presumptive Service Connection, you might be able to receive VA disability compensation if you suffer from any one of eight currently recognized health conditions.

Even if you have a condition not listed among the current eight medical conditions, you may still apply for VA disability benefits and pursue legal claims to recover for your illness. Veterans and their families may apply for VA benefits and compensation for medical conditions. Family members eligible for VA medical benefits may be reimbursed for their out-of-pocket costs for care. The medical benefits include no reimbursement payments, but VA can reimburse the veteran or a family member for the out-of-pocket costs for 15 alleged conditions.

Because of exposure, qualifying veterans are entitled to compensation from VA through Disability Insurance and Health Benefits at Camp Lejeune. Veterans and family members who drank tainted water at Camp Lejeune, a Marine Corps base, and suffered severe health conditions, as a result, are already entitled to receive disability and health care benefits through the Department of Veterans Affairs. In addition to conditions the VA specifically lists as qualifying conditions for VA benefits, many people exposed to the water at Camp Lejeune (including the families of Veterans) have experienced the following conditions, which could qualify them for Camp Lejeune claim benefits under the Honoring Our PACT Act. Under the Janey Ensminger Act of 2012, military members can obtain VA disability benefits if they demonstrate they were deployed at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune from nineteen fifty-three to nineteen eighty-seven for a minimum of thirty days and developed any of the conditions listed below.

If you or a relative of a member of the Armed Forces who resided or did work there or at the Air Station MCAS New River, NC, between August 1953 and December 1987, a physician diagnosed you with a specific condition. You may seek compensation through the United States Department of Veterans Affairs for lost earning capacity and medical expenses. Today, VA began providing disability benefits to veterans, reservists, and members of the National Guard affected by contaminants in Camp Lejeune, N.C. In addition, the Camp Lejeune Fairness Act requires VA to compensate family members for medical costs related to specific issues related to water contamination. Under the new 2022 Camp Lejeune Justice Act, veterans, and their loved ones can now qualify for significant compensation, even if they were denied benefits in the past or are currently receiving benefits.

Has The Camp Lejeune Lawsuit Been Settled? 

A new federal law would let victims sue for that contaminated water to get deserved compensation. Once the CLJA is passed, many of these plaintiffs, or their families, will again be filing suit against the Government over their exposure to the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune.

The new federal law bypasses the NC Repose Statute, allowing victims to sue in federal court if they were exposed to the contaminated Lejeune water, including during their pregnancy, for a minimum of 30 days. In addition, legislation passed in Congress bypasses the North Carolina repeal statute. Instead, it gives victims of Camp Lejeune the right to bring lawsuits for contaminated water in federal court to recover from cancer or other ailments caused by contaminated water.

By the end of the year, a new federal law passed by Congress will provide Camp Lejeune water contamination victims with the legal right to file civil suits and pursue financial compensation for their injuries. The Federal Government does not have a deadline to resolve Camp Lejeune water pollution claims. However, victims and families face one deadline, which impacts how long they are allowed to wait before filing suit. Today, victims exposed to toxins are eligible to file Camp Lejeune toxic water claims or lawsuits to obtain financial compensation to which they are entitled.

After the President has ratified it, the Camp Lejeune Justice Act will enable victims of pollution to file suits and receive financial settlements. In 2009, several Camp Lejeune Water Contamination victims began filing lawsuits against the US Government under the Federal Tort Claims Act, alleging that they developed cancers and other health problems from exposure to harmful chemicals that polluted Camp Lejeune’s drinking water.

From August 1953 through December 1987, the drinking water at the US Military base Camp Lejeune was contaminated with hazardous chemicals, which may have caused several types of cancer, congenital disabilities, Parkinson’s disease, and other serious illnesses. As a result, many individuals present at Camp Lejeune, exposed to the water through drinking, cooking, and bathing, developed serious illnesses, such as cancer, Parkinson’s’ disease, kidney disease, congenital disabilities, miscarriages, neurological problems, heart problems, and a host of other serious health problems.

The bill would allow individuals who lived or worked or were injured while pregnant at Camp Lejeune from 1953 through 1987 to bring suit for toxic water exposure before the Eastern District of NC. This decision effectively eliminated any legal avenues for victims to pursue lawsuits, as exposure to the contaminated water occurred with active-duty military personnel at the base, and claims by the North Carolina Statute of Repose, family members, were prohibited. More than 850 cases from multiple plaintiffs were combined in the MDL. However, these suits were dismissed because of North Carolinas law, known as the statute of repose, which states that legal actions cannot be filed because the purported contamination of water occurred more than three years before filing. 

Who Qualifies For The Camp Lejeune Lawsuit?

The Camp Lejeune Fairness Act is part of the new bill, which allows veterans, families, and workers to make claims for compensation if veterans were exposed to the toxic water on the Marine Corps base Camp Lejeune from 1953 through 1987. Thanks to the legislation passed by Congress, victims can now claim and receive a settlement payment from Camp Lejeune or a jury award for harm done to them if they resided or were employed near Camp Lejeune between 1953 and the late 1980s diagnosed with cancer or neurological disease. In addition, the Camp Lejeune Fairness Act allows marines, families, and any civilian contractors injured while drinking the water on Camp Lejeune to seek compensation via administrative claims and, eventually, litigation. Under the Act, any person residing, working, or otherwise exposed to Camp Lejeune drinking water for 30 days or longer, from 1953, through 1987 can pursue a claim for damages.

That language says that anyone who can show they were exposed to Camp Lejeune water for at least one month during the time period that it was contaminated (i.e., from 1953 through 1987) would be eligible to file a lawsuit under the law Congress passed. To qualify for the compensation, an individual must have lived, worked, served, or been present at Camp Lejeune for days between August 1953 and December 1987; they developed an injury (such as cancer or another illness) from Camp Lejeune’s contaminated water. Like veterans, family members would need to claim compensation and include medical records, along with evidence that they lived at the base; during the period of August 1953 to December 1987, at least 30 days were spent at either Camp Lejeune or MCAS New River. Because of high levels of contaminants in the water, individuals living and working at the bases for at least one month from August 1, 1953, through December 31, 1987, can suffer from a wide variety of serious illnesses, which have been included in lawsuits seeking compensation.

This recently passed legislation will permit people with more severe injuries to bring suits even if they were potentially exposed in their mother’s wombs) to highly cancer-causing chemicals found in water on the base at any time between Aug. 1953 and Dec. 1987. The new federal law bypasses the North Carolina Repose Act, allowing victims to sue in federal court if they were exposed to the Lejeune-contaminated water (even in utero) for at least 30 days. If passed, this legislation would permit anyone exposed to Camp Lejeune waters, including those in their wombs, for at least 30 days from August 1, 1953, through December 31, 1987, to file a lawsuit. There is still one burden on victims of the Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Act, and those seeking to file a lawsuit under CLJA against the Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Act would have to submit documents showing they lived or worked at Camp Lejeune for 30 days in the time period.

Our Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Lawyers are now accepting new Camp Lejeune Water Contamination claims from victims that spent time at the base and got leukemia, bladder cancer, renal cancer, liver cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, anemia, or other myelodysplastic syndromes.

How how long does it take to receive a settlement for Camp Lejeune?

The Federal Government does not have a deadline to settle the Camp Lejeune contamination claims. However, victims and families face one that will impact how long they can wait before filing suit. A new federal law bypasses the North Carolina restraining order. Instead, it allows victims to sue in federal court if they were exposed to Lejeune’s contaminated water for at least 30 days, including during pregnancy. This recently passed legislation will allow the people who suffered the greatest damage to sue in federal court, even though they were likely exposed in-utero (in their mother’s wombs) to highly cancer-causing chemicals found in base water anytime from August 1953 through December 1987. In addition, new legislation signed in August 2002 gives veterans and their families the right to file civil suits against the United States government for injuries caused by exposure of at least 30 days, including in-utero exposure, to drinking water on the Marine Corps base Camp Lejeune, N.C., between August 1, 1953, and December 31, 1987.

Legal claims against the US government for Camp Lejeune water contamination would probably be certified as class actions, and Congress has already appropriated settlement funds. However, while criteria are helping the federal Government resolve disability claims filed by veterans and their families, and billions of dollars are providing settlements to legal claims over health effects caused by Camp Lejeune water pollution, one of the biggest questions remaining is just how long a legal case over Camp Lejeune water pollution takes. The Camp Lejeune Fairness Act of 2022 sets two years starting on the date the Act is passed for veterans, their families, and others exposed to the contaminated Camp Lejeune drinking water to bring legal claims.

The new legislation (the Camp Lejeune Justice Act of 2022 (CJLA), would repeal the Government’s statute of limitations and qualified immunity protections for claims brought by individuals harmed by the Government’s pollution of Camp Lejeune’s water. The new law prohibits the United States Government from inserting an immunity that had previously prevented the prosecution from proceeding. It also overrides the 10-year North Carolina statute of limitations for claims related to Camp Lejeune water contamination. Today, as a result of the Camp Lejeune Fairness Act, victims of toxic exposures are free to bring a claim or a court action for toxic Camp Lejeune water exposure to obtain the monetary relief to which they are entitled.

While settlement payments for Camp Lejeune toxic exposure victims are estimated to total $6.7 billion, individuals filing claims will be awarded anywhere from $25,000 to $1 million and up, depending on the severity of their illnesses. Therefore, the total compensation from the settlement will hinge on the total number of claims filed, the details of your case, and your legal team.

What Is The Average Payout For Camp Lejeune Lawsuit?

 

We can use previous settlement amounts from comparable cases and injuries to estimate an average settlement in the Camp Lejeune litigation. While the amounts listed here are not necessarily representative of what plaintiffs could expect to receive from their Camp Lejeune lawsuits (remember, there are no guarantees, and we are merely estimating potential compensation in the Camp Lejeune water contamination cases), they do reflect some precedent regarding settlements in contaminated cases.

Camp Lejeune water pollution claims that include bladder cancer could be worth slightly more than $170,000-$220,000 as an estimated settlement. A more significant payment will be offered in a successful Camp Lejeune water lawsuit where victims or family members can demonstrate that drinking the water caused their leukemia. Our Camp Lejeune lawyers believe this new law wants victims of Camp Lejeune water contamination to get a fair settlement for the damage done when they or family members served in the Government.

Our attorneys are monitoring information about toxic clam counts very closely, as we believe that will affect the compensation awarded to all victims. This page provides the latest updates — essential information that you can use, regardless of whether or not you retain our lawyers — about a new law allowing victims of contaminated water to join together in civil suits seeking equitable settlement compensation. Our lawyers are certain New River Air Station is a party to that legislation and that the Navy and the Department of Justice pay out settlements for those claims, just like any other Camp Lejeune litigation. 

After the President has ratified it, the Camp Lejeune Justice Act will enable victims of pollution to bring suits and receive financial compensation. It also contains provisions known as the Camp Lejeune Justice Act that permit civil suits against the Government for injuries related to the contamination of the North Carolina base water supply between August 1953 and December 1987. In 2009, several victims of water contamination at Camp Lejeune began filing suits against the Government under the Tort Claims Act, alleging that they developed cancers and other health problems as a result of their exposure to the harmful chemicals that polluted Camp Lejeune’s drinking water.

A Camp Lejeune settlement is the amount of financial compensation a legal team and the federal Government agree on to compensate for injuries related to exposure to toxic water on the base. The injury lawyers in our network are available to answer questions about the water lawsuits being filed. The law may limit the time you have to file a claim. Thousands of contamination lawsuits have already been filed, so you must act now.

The passage of PACT legislation would make available Camp Lejeune settlement benefits to more than one million U.S. Marines and their spouses and families. They were exposed to contaminants when living on or near Camp Lejeune from 1953 through 1987. Once a new federal law is passed, everyone suffering a water toxicology-related illness due to Camp Lejeune exposure would have the right to sue for damages against the Government. In addition, the new federal law will enable victims to file a lawsuit for that contaminated water to receive necessary compensation.

Victims pursuing toxic water claims will be awarded a hefty settlement that can exceed $1 million in some cases. In all likelihood, victims enduring deplorable conditions like cancer, leukemia, or Parkinson’s will receive more significant settlement funds to compensate them compared to victims diagnosed with less severe health problems stemming from water. While settlement payments to victims of Camp Lejeune’s toxic exposure are estimated to total $6.7 billion, individuals filing claims will be paid anywhere from $25,000 to $1 million and up, depending on the severity of their illnesses.

 

Do I Need A Lawyer For My Lawsuit Regarding Camp Lejeune?

 

The 2022 Camp Lejeune Justice Act, which is now working its way through Congress, would allow victims of toxic water at Camp Lejeune to bring suit Eastern District of NC. Under the language of the Camp Lejeune Justice Act, any person who spent time at Camp Lejeune from 1953 through 1987 for at least thirty days, and was exposed to its contaminated water, may bring suit against the US Additionally, it has a clause known as the 2022 Camp Lejeune Justice Act, which allows individuals affected by the toxic water at Camp Lejeune to file federal lawsuits seeking damages. The Camp Lejeune Justice Act is a comprehensive, bipartisan legislative package that repeals North Carolina laws that had previously blocked legal actions against the Federal Government and now allows veterans, family members, and civilian workers to file claims to receive compensation if veterans were subjected to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune from 1953 through 1987.

Unless the legislation passed by Congress makes it easier to bring suit, lawyers at Camp Lejeune would first bring a Federal Tort Claims Act suit with the Department of Defense, as required by federal law. The first step is to contact a knowledgeable Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Lawyer who can assist in filing your lawsuit against the United States Government. The law firm you hire to pursue your Camp Lejeune Marine Base suit must have experience with personal injury and wrongful death cases that involve toxic exposure or water contamination. In short, your claim will have to be filed in federal court. In addition, you will have to present medical evidence about your injuries and how your healthcare needs are related to your exposure to the contaminated Camp Lejeune drinking water. 

Under the Act, a relative or a legal representative may bring a lawsuit on behalf of an individual, whether alive or deceased, who was exposed to contaminated water during the specified timeframe. Individuals have up to two years to file a lawsuit following the law’s passage on August 10, 2022. Under the language of the legislation that passed Congress, victims may still file claims for new injuries and illnesses discovered after August 8. Our lawyers are aware that the lawsuit against the Federal Government over Camp Lejeune is the same administration with specifically written legislation allowing victims to bring claims for damages. 

 

What Are The Camp Lejeune Presumptive Conditions?

As of March 14, 2017, the VA announced eight alleged conditions, which eliminated the requirement for the veteran to demonstrate that their diagnosed condition was caused by exposure to contaminated water. Disability compensation for the eight presumptive conditions is awarded to veterans exposed to contaminated water on the base during their eligible time; medical benefits or medical costs are reimbursed for veterans and their families for the 15 conditions related to their Camp Lejeune service.

Suppose you have a record of having served at the base between August 1, 1953, and December 31, 1987, served at least 30 days there during the specified period, and developed a condition you believe is linked to toxic water at Camp Lejeune. In that case, the VA encourages you to file a claim for disability compensation. However, if you served at that camp and have since developed a condition that is not listed, you may still apply for disability compensation from the VA. While the provisions are missing for seven conditions that are not prerequisites for veterans to receive disability compensation, this does not mean veterans should not apply for compensation.

Subject to the service mentioned above criteria, individuals suffering from several other illnesses and conditions may petition for benefits with the VA and file compensation claims. When a veteran from one of these groups is diagnosed with one of these conditions, the VA will assume the circumstances of that veteran’s service caused that condition. Then disability benefits may be quickly granted. The VA automatically grants disability benefits to eligible individuals who have those conditions.

Qualified Armed Forces members who suffer from an illness with presumptive status are automatically entitled to VA disability benefits. In addition, certain groups of former service members can be eligible for benefits with the presumptive disease. For example, veterans who served in a concentration camp from 1953 to 1987 may qualify for VA disability compensation on presumptive service-connected grounds, provided that they have been diagnosed with one of the mentioned conditions.

The additional 15 presumptive conditions are not eligible for presumptive disability compensation. However, veterans with the following medical conditions are encouraged to file claims even though they are not presumptive because of toxicity-related connections. Presumptive conditions are medical conditions the VA assumes were caused by military service and are associated with groups of veterans under certain circumstances in their military service. There are also additional health problems currently not mentioned on VAs list of Presumptive Service-Connected Diseases and have not yet been classified by the ATSDR as having sufficient evidence that is at least as vital, that is nevertheless prevalent in individuals exposed to contaminated Camp Lejeune water.

(ATSDR) Men at Camp Lejeune who drank contaminated water had a twofold increased risk of developing liver cancer compared to men who did not. It is thought that individuals may have been exposed to toxins like benzene and trichloroethylene through contaminated water, increasing their risk of developing liver cancer.

Notably, a considerable amount of research has been conducted on the camp’s toxic water and related health conditions. Overall, the Veterans Administration investigated claims about contaminated water and came up with eight conditions primarily caused by drinking or bathing in water, beginning in 1953 and ending in 1987. The presumed service-connection rules for the eight illnesses linked to pollutants in the groundwater resources have been established by the VA. Between 1953 and 1987, eight diseases at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune were linked to pollutants in the water supply.

To reiterate, individuals diagnosed with a medical illness or condition not listed in VAs list of presumptive service-connected medical conditions at Camp Lejeune or that is currently not identified by the ATSDR as having at least as probable as not as related to chemicals in Camp Lejeune’s water, may still be eligible for the process. For example, suppose you, a family member, or a relative spent time at Camp Lejeune for days or more but was not diagnosed with a health condition related to water contamination but was not diagnosed with a medical condition related to contamination. In that case, you may not be eligible to file a suit. In other words, just because you do not have one of the eight alleged conditions or one of the qualified illnesses does not mean that your disease was not caused by contamination, nor does it prohibit you from seeking benefits and compensation.

Camp Lejeune veterans might lack a presumptive condition allowing them to obtain VA benefits without a record linking their illness to their service. Although VA has not granted presumptive status for many other illnesses and conditions, it offers certain benefits for eligible Camp Lejeune military personnel, loved ones, and civilians suffering from these conditions. In addition, the VA would create a presumption that members of the Reserves and the National Guard who served at Camp Lejeune during that time and who subsequently developed one of the eight medical conditions became permanently disabled during their respective period of service, for purposes of establishing active duty service for the purposes of benefits. Compensation also would be offset against Federal benefits received by any person meeting these criteria who had received benefits because of a claimed condition, such as VA or Medicare benefits because of Camp Lejeune’s exposure to toxic water.

While limited, the final rules are nonetheless a significant step toward providing disability compensation for eligible veterans, former members of the Reserves, and former members of the National Guard affected by this illness. Under this legislation, veterans and their families exposed to the toxic waters can automatically be eligible for some health benefits. When filing for disability benefits, VA requires a doctor’s note and a doctor’s testimony showing the veteran’s conditions are related to their time in military service.

 

What Cancers Are Covered Under Camp Lejeune Water Contamination?

Tier II includes cancer types that may be linked to contaminants based at least in part on epidemiological research. However, the proof is not clear. Then in Tier I. A handful of case-control and ecologic studies suggest a connection between contaminants found in the Camp Lejeune water supply and a handful of different types of cancer. Scientific studies conducted by public health agencies found that Camp Lejeune residents and employees exposed to contaminated water had substantially higher risks of developing lung cancer and dying of lung cancer than the control group. According to research on public health, people (both men and women) who resided or were employed at Camp Lejeune and were exposed to polluted water suffered health problems and showed an increased incidence of cancer in the breast.

The ATSDR discovered that males who drank Camp Lejeune’s tainted water had a twofold increased risk of developing liver cancer compared to men who did not. Compounds discovered in Camp Lejeune’s tainted water could be responsible for multiple types of cancer, according to data from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ASTDR). Victims said that the increase in cases of prostate cancer and other illnesses among former service members, their families, and civilian workers could be tied to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune. Researchers have linked the increased death rates from at least twelve types of cancers specifically to contaminated water exposures at Camp Lejeune, according to a study by the ASTDR.

In addition to kidney cancers and diseases, the ATSDR study found compelling evidence indicating that contaminated Camp Lejeune drinking water was associated with increased risks for bladder cancer. When comparisons were made between civilian workers who had higher exposures in Camp Lejeune and those who had lower exposures, higher cumulative exposures to contaminants were associated with increased risks for kidney, esophagus, prostate, and rectal cancers, leukemia, and Parkinson’s disease. This study aimed to determine if the potential exposures to drinking water contaminants at Camp Lejeune were associated with increased risks for specific types of cancers and other chronic diseases in civilian workers employed on the base. Smoking very slightly enhanced the chance of any correlations between causes of death and exposures to drinking water toxins at Camp Lejeune, according to the study’s findings on smoking-related causes of death, including heart disease, stomach cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

However, the death rate from kidney cancer was 41 times higher in those study participants with the most significant toxic exposures (i.e., people who worked or lived for a prolonged period at Camp Lejeune) than in the controls.

It is thought that contaminated water might have a higher risk of liver cancer by exposing people to chemicals such as benzene and trichloroethylene. These substances also can raise the risk of other diseases, but there is not enough scientific evidence to prove a link between prostate cancer and exposure. In addition, exposure to these chemicals does not necessarily mean an individual will develop cancer. However, the risk increases the more frequently, the more, and how much an individual is exposed.

If no studies have linked your specific cancer to exposure to the toxins mentioned above, it is still possible that studies could be done that would confirm the link. The possibility that contaminant co-exposures are confounding the health of affected individuals cannot also be excluded.

For instance, if someone developed cancer due to exposure, then suffered some form of heart disease or damage from chemotherapy treatments, W&L believes both problems are related to the contaminated water exposure and need to be identified. The committee recommended that issues with contrast sensitivity and color discrimination be included in clinical guidelines and algorithms on renal toxicities as neurobehavioral effects that might arise from Camp Lejeune’s exposure to contaminated drinking water. However, the committee recognized that these are generally subclinical (i.e., they are not detectable by routine screening), and no treatments are currently available for these. Consistent with VA policy that in cases of reasonable doubt about a diagnosis or primary cause for diagnosis, clinicians should make the determination favoring the veteran, or the Camp Lejeune family member, the committee recommends that the VA consider including illicit drug use by adolescents and adults and bipolar disorder as neurobehavioral effects at Camp Lejeune.

The committee recommends that VA include patients in the Camp Lejeune program who have second-primary cancers (but not recurrent or metastatic cancers) whose first-primary cancer is one of the covered cancers, even if their first-primary cancer was diagnosed prior to their residence at Camp Lejeune. The Camp Lejeune Fairness Act includes a number of medical conditions recognized as presumptive by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), meaning the agency would assume water contamination at Camp Lejeune was a cause of an adverse medical condition of any Veteran exposed to the water at Camp Lejeune and diagnosed with one of the conditions listed. The VA is now beginning to revise VA regulations to establish service-connected presumptions for liver angiosarcoma, acute myelogenous leukemia, and kidney cancer, all known to have been associated with prolonged exposure to chemicals in Camp Lejeune water.

Water contamination on the USMC base Camp Lejeune has been linked to Camp Lejeune’s prostate cancer (as well as other cancers and diseases), and the prospective victims deserve justice. Scientific and medical evidence collected by government organizations like the ATSDR, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others have also concluded that water at Camp Lejeune is probably responsible for the range of health conditions suffered by veterans, families, civilian workers, and others living and working at Camp Lejeune and Marine Corps Air Station New River.

Each of the studies conducted by ATSDR has added to the growing body of scientific information available on drinking water contaminated with volatile organic compounds, and its consequences on health may help us better understand future exposures. In addition, the studies made essential contributions to the scientific literature, providing further insight into drinking water contaminated with volatile organic compounds and its consequences on health.

  

Is Non Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Linked To Camp Lejeune?

 

In 2017, the US VA, based on an analysis by the Camp Lejeune Technical Working Group (TWG), acknowledged that the TCE and benzene exposures from Camp Lejeune’s water supplies showed sufficient evidence for the causality of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. ATSDR’s research, based on a health survey of thousands of former Camp Lejeune residents and independent epidemiological studies, found that exposure to TCE, one of the major chemicals in drinking water, was highly associated with an increase in the incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The ASTDR has enough evidence to suggest that exposure to dangerous chemicals detected in Camp Lejeune’s drinking water may lead to Non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Below, our contamination attorneys review studies conducted about water contamination at Camp Lejeune and the evidence linking the toxic substances to non-Hodgkins Lymphoma and other conditions. Besides showing high rates of non-Hodgkins Lymphoma, the scientific studies provide compelling evidence linking water contamination to other illnesses, including liver cancer, congenital disabilities, and prostate cancer. For instance, one study discovered a higher chance of death for one hundred and fifty-four individuals with a variety of illnesses, such as multiple myeloma, Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, esophageal, kidney, and liver malignancies.

The higher rates of renal health effects from consuming water contaminated with volatile chemical compounds are mostly in people with higher cumulative exposure to contaminants. Unfortunately, many men and women who trained at the Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune and their families and people working on the base were exposed to the contaminated water, and some developed non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. This cancer develops in the lymphatic system that can spread throughout the body. Between 1953 and 1987, a range of chemical contaminants polluted the waters of Camp Lejeune, N.C., including trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), vinyl chloride, benzene, and others. Therefore, your medical history prior to the time at Camp Lejeune, during the time on the base, and while receiving a diagnosis and treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma may be pertinent in showing the decline in your health following your exposure to Camp Lejeune water.

Although having one of these alleged presumptive medical conditions These presumptive health conditions means you do not need to prove the illness was caused by water at Camp Lejeune, N.C., you still will need to prove you were deployed at the base during the time periods listed in the Camp Lejeune Fairness Act to receive disability benefits. Section 804 of the Act, called the “Camp Lejeune Justice Act of 2022,” allows individuals who lived, worked, and trained at Camp Lejeune to file for government compensation for damages caused by exposure to contaminated drinking water — damages like developing non-Hodgkins Lymphoma and other cancers. While the victim of Camp Lejeune water pollution may continue to claim damages for any injury or illness he or she suffered due to exposure to contaminants. At the same time, at Camp Lejeune, there are specific conditions that the Government has already suggested a link between water pollution and illness. You may not be eligible to file a lawsuit if you, a friend or relative, or a loved one actually lived at Camp Lejeune for thirty days or more (consecutive or nonconsecutive) in 1953 and 1987, but you have not been given a medical issue that is linked to the contamination of water.

The strength of your legal claim will depend on the severity of your illness and the degree to which you can link your illness to contaminated water. For more information, please contact our injury attorneys, or complete this form, so that we can begin immediately assessing the link between contaminated water and your illness/injury. Once determined, we handle the rest — completing and filing your Statement of Claim, gathering the documentation that demonstrates you were present at Camp Lejeune, working with medical experts to connect your illness with Camp Lejeune contaminated water, and, above all, advocating on your behalf to help you obtain compensation in addition to your disability benefits. We have offered estimates on potential settlement amounts based on previous tort cases involving non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, the strength of epidemiological links between Lymphoma and contaminated water, and the general nature of this cancer.

Certain medical conditions also have been identified by the Public Health Service, US Department of Health and Human Services, and ATSDR as supported by enough evidence, or supported by sufficient studies, to connect a medical condition with exposure to poisonous chemicals found at Camp Lejeune. In prior enactment of legislation supporting victims affected at Camp Lejeune, the Government has acknowledged the linkage between Camp Lejeune water and eight health conditions that are closely related and probably caused by water on the military base during the time the contamination occurred. Historical modeling determined that the pollution began in 1953 and ended in 1987. The study concluded that there was a strong connection between drinking water and cancer.

The contamination in the water was determined to have been caused by on-site industrial activities and a dry cleaning plant that was not located on-site. This contaminated water was used by the service members working and living at the base and their families and workers outside the base. During that 34-year time frame, innocent marines, military families, and civilians living and working on the base drank and bathed in poisoned water. The reason for this is that chemicals in the water affect fetal development.

The complaint further alleges that exposure of Plaintiffs to those chemicals caused Plaintiffs. The Army has previously dismissed claims related to the contamination of the Camp Lejeune Water, but due to the recent passage of the Camp Lejeune Fairness Act, a component of the more significant PACT Act, which passed the Senate on August 2, 2022, service members suffering severe health problems can now bring lawsuits against the federal Government seeking damages for their injuries.

 

Does water Contaminate cause Parkinson’s Disease At Camp Lejeune?

 

A special expert panel report identified several studies suggesting Parkinson’s disease could be linked to pollution. According to allegations from thousands of victims and legal experts, water contaminants from Camp Lejeune could be responsible for the subsequent development of Parkinson’s and other cancers and illnesses. In addition, studies recently concluded that Parkinson’s is one of the long-term health conditions which could be caused by exposure to chemicals in Camp Lejeune’s water supply.

Speak to an experienced contamination attorney to protect your legal rights by calling (866) 240-2414 or completing our free case evaluation form.

Originally, Parkinson’s – as well as multiple myeloma, end-stage renal disease, and scleroderma – were not included on a list of diseases presumptively linked to exposure to contaminants in Camp Lejeune’s water supply. This committee recommended VA consider adding Parkinson’s’ disease in clinical guidelines and algorithm B as a neurobehavioral effect that can occur from exposure to contaminated Camp Lejeune drinking water. Based on positive trends in increased risks of occupational exposures and from drinking water, NRC agreed that neurobehavioral effects, mainly Parkinson’s, should be included in, and covered under, Department of Veterans Affairs benefits.

The Special Health Benefit is intended for treatments related to the health conditions and diseases these veterans may develop due to their exposure to Camp Lejeune’s water supplies. As a result, the Army established the Health Care Program to provide care and benefits for veterans who served on those bases and were exposed to contaminated water. In addition, a recent report from The National Academies Press found that people subjected to toxic water at Camp Lejeune faced significantly increased risks of developing serious health conditions, including Parkinson’s, leukemia, and other diseases.

There are several other health conditions, which are currently unreferenced on VAs list of alleged service-connected diseases, and are currently not identified by ATSDR as having at least a probable cause-effect relationship, which is nevertheless prevalent in individuals exposed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune. In addition, scientific and medical evidence has shown a link between exposure to these contaminants while on active duty and the development of specific diseases later. For instance, studies have estimated that more than 900,000 service members diagnosed with severe illnesses, including Parkinson’s, could have been exposed to contaminants.

The Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Base and the Marine Corps Air Station New River are home to a variety of people who live and work there, including veterans, families, civilian employees, and others. Based on scientific and medical data gathered by government agencies including the ATSDR, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others, it has also been determined that Camp Lejeune’s water is likely to blame for the wide range of health conditions experienced by these people. This study aimed to determine if possible exposure to Camp Lejeune’s Camp Lejeune drinking water contaminants was associated with increased risks for deaths from certain types of cancers and other chronic illnesses for people employed on the base. Results from the study on smoking-related factors of mortality, including stomach cancer, heart disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, suggested that smoking would only have a negligible effect on any associations between causes of death and drinking water contaminant exposures at Camp Lejeune.

Certain medical conditions have also been identified by the Public Health Service, Department of Health and Human Services, and ATSDR as being supported by enough evidence, or supported enough studies, to link a medical condition with exposure to compounds found at Camp Lejeune. The ATSDR similarly conducted multiple studies, once again linking TCE and PCE to later diagnoses of Parkinson’s disease. This committee found the preponderance of the evidence suggests that deficiencies in visual and contrast differentiation may have been caused by exposure to TCE, PCE, or solvents and are neurobehavioral effects of solvent exposures which may be caused by the Camp Lejeune drinking water contamination in pregnancy, childhood, and adulthood.

Although most diseases listed in the Janey Ensminger Act were associated with adult exposures to solvents, the Act also recognizes that pregnant women residing at Camp Lejeune may have consumed the contaminated drinking water and, by doing so, may have unintentionally exposed their fetuses. Other studies on exposure in infancy or in the infant’s life span solvents include one case-control study on mothers at Camp Lejeune at the time of water contamination (Ruckart et al., 2013), the national congenital disability prevention population-based study (Desrosiers et al., 2012), and two studies on exposure to environmental exposures (Storm et al., 2011; Till et al., 2005). In addition, a recent study found a significant correlation between exposure to water and Parkinson’s disease.

We highly recommend that individuals who have developed Parkinson’s due to being exposed to water at Camp Lejeune contact our attorneys because they may have the right to receive compensation. For example, if you or someone you love was exposed to contaminated water chemicals and received an adverse medical diagnosis, a highly skilled attorney can help you pursue compensation. In addition, if you are a family member of a fatality who died due to the progression of Parkinson’s disease or complications, our legal team can help you file a wrongful death claim, which can include compensation for funeral costs, unpaid medical bills, and other associated losses.

Where previous laws addressed medical losses and disability only, the Camp Lejeune Fairness Act allows victims of the Camp Lejeune Water Contamination to pursue a more comprehensive claim, which includes the burden of damages that they suffered from illnesses that resulted from water contamination. Our attorneys believe that JAGs will want to provide a fair compensation award in an early phase of litigation regarding Camp Lejeune Parkinsons Disease, which may result in more significant awards and injuries strongly linked to contaminated water.

Between 1953 and 1987, trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), vinyl chloride, benzene, and other chemical solvents poisoned by the nearby dry-cleaning facility compromised Camp Lejeune’s water system.

 

Can I sue if a member of my family who was stationed at Camp Lejeune died of cancer?

 

Suppose you or a family member has experienced health complications caused by the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune, NC. In that case, you may be eligible to receive compensation by filing a Camp Lejeune lawsuit against the Federal Government. Likewise, if you, a family member, or a loved one suffered a health impact from contamination, you could have grounds to file a lawsuit. Anyone exposed to the Camp Lejeune Water Contamination during their time at the base, including service members, military family members, and civilian employees, may be eligible for compensation through this law. The Camp Lejeune Fairness Act empowers marines, family members, and any civilian contractor harmed by drinking the water on Camp Lejeune to seek compensation through administrative claims and, eventually, litigation. 

This year North Carolina Camp Lejeune Justice Act was passed, allowing troops, family members, and any employees exposed to the contaminated water to seek compensation by filing suit. The Camp Lejeune Justice Act is part of the new bill, which allows veterans, family members, and employees to file lawsuits seeking compensation if veterans were exposed to toxic water on the base of Camp Lejeune from 1953-1987. Veterans and family members who were exposed to poisonous water at Camp Lejeune and suffered severe health conditions, as a result, are already entitled to receive disability compensation and medical benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs. For example, the US Veterans Administration found that just 30 days of continuous exposure to contaminated water at Lejeune in the years 1953-1987 could qualify veterans and their family members there for medical benefits, as long as they suffered leukemia, multiple myeloma, bladder cancer, liver cancer, kidney cancer, breast cancer,  non-Hodgkin lymphoma, miscarriage, neurobehavioral effects, and scleroderma, an autoimmune disorder.

To file a successful lawsuit seeking compensation for the loss of life at Lejeune, family members would have to show that the deceased lived or worked at Lejeune during the contamination and that he died prematurely of the medical conditions associated with deadly chemicals. Under the new federal law, which is on its way, the immediate family members of individuals who died prematurely due to water contamination at Camp Lejeune will be entitled to file a wrongful death suit against the Federal Government. As a result, thousands of victims sickened and injured from contaminated water can now bring suit.

This recently passed legislation will enable those who suffered the most harm to sue in federal court, even though they were likely exposed in utero (in their mother’s wombs) to highly cancer-causing chemicals found in base water anytime from August 1953 through December 1987. Males, females, children, and unborn children who lived worked, or were exposed to Camp Lejeune drinking water and who can tie their diseases and injuries to hazardous water exposures are eligible to file lawsuits.

Many individuals at Camp Lejeune exposed to the water through drinking, cooking, and bathing developed severe illnesses, such as cancer, Parkinson’s, renal failure, congenital disabilities, miscarriages, neurological problems, heart problems, and several other serious illnesses health problems. From 1953-1987, U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) training facilities at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, exposed service members, their families, and civilian workers to contaminated water for drinking, cooking, and bathing. In 1953, it was estimated that a million service members, workers, and families were exposed to contaminated water in the base housing or training areas.

The Camp Lejeune Justice Act has received bipartisan support, and it would have provided former residents, veterans, civilians, and the families of former residents with the opportunity to sue in federal court to obtain financial compensation for damages.

 

Are Family Members Eligible For Compensation If They Got Sick From Water Contamination At Camp Lejeune?

 

Suppose you or a family member have developed health problems from the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune, NC. In that case, you may be eligible to receive compensation by filing a Camp Lejeune lawsuit against the Federal Government. Under the CLJA, if you suffer from a medical condition or an injury related to the water at Camp Lejeune, our attorneys will fight so you can receive medical care, disability benefits, and claim/suit relief. In addition, the US Department of Veterans Affairs has determined that just 30 days of continuous exposure to the Lejeune water contamination in the years between 1953 and 1987 can qualify veterans and family members for health benefits, should they have leukemia, multiple myeloma, cancer of the bladder, liver cancer, kidney cancer, breast cancer, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, miscarriage, neurobehavioral effects, and scleroderma, the autoimmune disorder. The Justice at Camp Lejeune Act is part of a new bill allowing veterans, family members, and workers to make claims for compensation if veterans were exposed to the poisonous water at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune from 1953 through 1987.

Enactment of the PACT Act would make the benefits available in the Camp Lejeune Settlement to more than one million U.S. Marines and their spouses and families who were exposed to contaminants when living on or near Camp Lejeune from 1953 through 1987. The Honor Our Contract Act (which encompasses the Justice at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune Act) provides veterans who suffered severe health consequences due to exposure to toxic chemicals from the Camp Lejeune water system while serving compensation. The Camp Lejeune Justice Act allows marines, families, and any civilian contractors harmed by drinking the water at Camp Lejeune to seek compensation through administrative claims and, eventually, litigation. This lawsuit was among the first Camp Lejeune suits settled as part of the VAs new disability compensation program for members harmed by water at the base.

In 2009, several victims of the Camp Lejeune water contamination began filing suit against the US government, alleging that they developed cancers and other health problems as a result of their exposure to harmful chemicals that polluted the Camp Lejeune drinking water. In addition, many individuals present at Camp Lejeune who were exposed to the water through drinking, cooking, and bathing developed severe illnesses, such as cancer, Parkinson’s disease, renal failure, congenital disabilities, miscarriages, neurological problems, heart problems, and several other serious health problems. Whether you are a service member seeking to increase your disability compensation due to a condition caused by known cancer-causing chemicals or other service-related exposures, a family member exposed on base, a family member of a veteran injured while serving at Camp Lejeune, or you worked on base and now suffer from an illness or injury from your time at Camp Lejeune, contact our lawyers to discuss your condition and your options for medical care and compensation for your condition.

  

Is Prostate Cancer A Disease Caused By The Water At Camp Lejeune?

 

A recently favorable Veterans Court decision, wherein the Board of Veterans Appeals awarded Service Connections to Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) and Prostate Cancer stemming from exposure to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune. The Veterans Appeals Board found that the evidence was consistent with the determination that our client’s CLL and prostate cancer were caused as much or more likely than not by exposure to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune. However, several months later, the Board issued a decision that denied a service connection for prostate cancer and the water at Camp Lejeune. The victims contended that an explosion in cases of prostate cancer and other illnesses among former service members, their families, and civilian workers could be linked to the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune.

U.S. Marines, their family members, and employees exposed to PCE, or both PCE and TCE – the two significant contaminants of drinking water at Camp Lejeune – are at increased risk for bladder cancer. Exposure to contaminated water is a significant health hazard, especially when it involves chemicals that can cause cancer, such as the chemicals found at Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, NC. Contaminants found in water at Camp Lejeune, N.C., between 1953 and 1987 included trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), vinyl chloride, benzene, and other substances. As a result, the contaminated Camp Lejeune water contains elevated levels of known toxic, cancer-causing substances such as benzene, vinyl chloride, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, and so forth.

Groundwater from two of Camp Lejeune’sLejeune’s water systems contained multiple contaminants known to cause cancer. The contamination in the water was determined to result from industrial activities at the base and a dry cleaning facility outside of the base. A comparator set of 4 was not exposed to the contaminated drinking water. The highest rates of kidney, prostate, and rectum cancers, leukemias, and Parkinson’s’ mainly were in group 4.

The results of the cigarette-related causes of death, such as stomach cancer, cardiovascular disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, suggested that cigarette smoking would only have a negligible effect on any associations between causes of death and drinking water contamination in Camp Lejeune. Therefore, the goal of the study was to determine if the potential for exposure to drinking water contaminants at Camp Lejeune was associated with an increased risk for specific types of cancers and other chronic diseases in people employed on the base. In addition, scientific and medical evidence collected from government organizations, such as the ATSDR, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others, have also concluded that Camp Lejeune’s water is probably responsible for the range of health problems veterans, their families, civilian employees, and those who reside and work at the Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune and the MCAS New River.

One study found that Marines who served at the base between 1975 and 1985 had a 10% higher risk of dying of any cancer than US Marines who served at Camp Pendleton, the military base where there was no contaminated water. Although ATSDRs research has examined links between prostate and breast cancer at Camp Lejeune’s contaminated water, those are not on the list of presumptively service-related cancers. Few people drinking water there have died, so further studies are needed to validate this risk.

In two previous articles (previously published, like this one, in The Columbia Star), we discussed the potential effects for Marines and dependents exposed to the contamination of Camp Lejeune’s water between 1957 and 1987; examined the toxins found in the water; discussed diseases that could have been caused by exposure to these toxins; and made suggestions about how one might file a claim with the VA. Many of our attorneys and staff members have strong family connections with the military. We are committed to seeking justice for veterans, their families, and civilian workers who may have had prostate cancer due to the contaminated water.

 

What Types Of Cancer Did Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Cause?

 

People who were deployed at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina when water was tainted had a higher risk of dying from multiple types of cancer, along with Lou Gehrig’s disease, according to a formal government report released Wednesday. Exposure to contaminated water is a significant health hazard, especially when it involves chemicals that can cause cancer, such as the chemicals involved at the base Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, NC. Researchers linked higher mortality rates for at least twelve types of cancers specifically to contaminated water exposures at Camp Lejeune, according to the ASTDR study.

Scientific studies conducted by public health agencies found that Camp Lejeune residents and employees exposed to the contaminated water had substantially higher risks of developing lung cancer and dying of lung cancer than the control group. A research agency discovered that men exposed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune were two times more likely to develop liver cancer than non-exposed men. In addition to kidney cancer and diseases, ATSDRs research found compelling evidence indicating that contaminated Camp Lejeune drinking water was associated with increased risks for bladder cancer.

The ASTDR studies also found a specific increased risk for kidney cancer, liver cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma, among others. The study also found that contaminated water exposure does not just lead to kidney cancer; it leads to other chronic kidney diseases.

In addition to bladder cancer, exposure to PCE and TCE chemicals was tied to an increased risk of kidney cancer and diseases. TCE is a known carcinogen most strongly associated with kidney cancer. Perchloroethylene (PCE) compounds are also linked to liver cancer by numerous studies.

Several toxic chemicals that can cause cancer include known carcinogens trichloroethylene (TCE), and perchloroethylene (PCE), also known as tetrachloroethene, vinyl chloride, and benzene. Toxic chemicals have horrible health effects, like bladder cancer and liver disease. Cancer-causing chemicals lead to severe health problems for exposed individuals, including cancers (liver and bladder), abortions, and congenital disabilities.

The risk of lung cancer goes up with exposure to some chemicals, including benzene. Exposure to these chemicals does not necessarily mean that an individual will develop cancer, but the risk increases the more frequently, the more, and how much an individual is exposed.

Dangerous chemicals include benzene, industrial solvents, and others, according to the VA, and many have been linked to cancer, including liver cancer. In their landmark report about the health risks associated with the water contamination of the Marine Corps base Camp Lejeune, the ATSDR included liver cancer among the 16 diseases directly linked to the contaminants.

The study objective was to determine if possible exposure to Camp Lejeune water contamination was associated with increased risks for specific types of cancers and other chronic diseases in civilian workers employed on the base. Results of studies on causes of death related to smoking, such as stomach cancer, cardiovascular disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, indicated that smoking increased the risk for any associations between causes of death and drinking water contaminants only slightly in Camp Lejeune.

These causes of death were included to evaluate any effect smoking might have had on the findings. Causes of death were selected from literature reviews conducted by the US EPA, NTP, IARC, and the ATSDR. In addition, certain medical conditions were also identified by the Public Health Service, US Department of Health and Human Services, and Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry as having adequate proof to support them. Enough evidence, or supported by sufficient studies, to attribute a medical condition to exposure to toxic chemicals found at Camp Lejeune.

Several case-control studies and ecological studies suggest a connection between contaminants found in Camp Lejeune’s water supply and many different types of cancer. Although one study by ATSDR identified prostate cancer as one of the types of cancers linked to contaminated water, many Camp Lejeune attorneys are dismissing the cases. In addition, one study found that US marines serving at Camp Lejeune between 1975 and 1985 had a 10% higher risk of dying of cancer than US marines serving at Camp Pendleton. At this military base, there was no contaminated water.

The study found that more than 150 had about a 10 % higher risk of dying from cancer than the 150 who served at Camp Pendleton in California. For those in the study with the most significant exposure to the toxicants — that is, those who worked or lived on Camp Lejeune the longest — the death rate from kidney cancer was 41 times higher compared with a control group. When the exposure to higher levels in the civilian workforce at Camp Lejeune was compared with that in Camp Lejeune workers who had lower exposure, higher cumulative exposures to contaminants were associated with increased risks for kidney, esophagus, prostate, and rectal cancers, leukemia, and Parkinson’s disease.

Studies conducted outside Camp Lejeune have also shown associations between breast cancer and occupational exposures to industrial solvent types (PCE and TCE) found in Camp Lejeune’s water supply. Several scientific studies were conducted with factory workers and others exposed to PCE, all indicating a positive correlation between PCE and the diagnosis of bladder cancer.

The National Research Council assembled a multidisciplinary panel consisting of environmental scientists, toxicologists, epidemiologists, and biostatisticians to examine the scientific evidence for adverse health effects with historical data of exposures to contaminated drinking water on Camp Lejeune, during pregnancy, in infancy, and adulthood. Medical and scientific evidence has linked contaminated drinking water with pediatric cancers, bladder cancers, multiple myeloma, liver cancers, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, congenital disabilities, and other severe health conditions. The most prevalent diseases associated with Liver cancer, liver damage, reproductive issues, and birth deformities result from contaminated healthy water. Sometimes, drinking contaminated water over an extended period causes blood and digestive cancer.

  

Is Breast Cancer Linked To Camp Lejeune Toxic Water?

 

Although ATSDRs research has examined a link between prostate and breast cancers in Camp Lejeune’s contaminated water, they are not on the list of presumptively service-related cancers. However, studies by DOD and others suggest that people exposed to the toxins in Camp Lejeune areas are at a higher risk for developing many health problems, including several types of cancer.

One study found that US marines serving at Camp Lejeune between 1975 and 1985 had 10 percent higher risks of dying of any kind of cancer than US marines serving at Camp Pendleton, the military base where no contaminated water was present. In one study of male veterans from Camp Lejeune, researchers found those exposed to the contaminated water were more than twice as likely as those not exposed to it to have been diagnosed with breast cancer. By exposing humans to pollutants like benzene and trichloroethylene, contaminated water is known to raise the risk of liver cancer. Exposure to contaminated water is a significant health hazard, especially when it involves chemicals known to cause cancer, such as those in U.S. Marine Base Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, NC.

This study’s objective was to determine whether potential exposure to tainted water at Camp Lejeune was linked to elevated risks for particular malignancies and other chronic diseases in civilian base employees. Results from the study on smoking-related factors of mortality, including stomach cancer, heart disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, indicated that smoking only marginally increased the risk for any associations between causes of death and exposures to drinking water contaminants at Camp Lejeune. In addition, exploratory analyses using proportional hazards methods were used to assess whether being based at Camp Lejeune and cumulative exposure to the drinking water contaminants was associated with earlier onset of male breast cancer.

Being permanently stationed at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune and having higher cumulative exposures to trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE), DCE, and vinyl chloride were associated with earlier age at onset of male breast cancer; the risk ratios ranged from 1.4-2.7, with large confidence intervals for cumulative exposure variables. Another study by CDC focused exclusively on cases of breast cancer among men exposed to TCE, Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), and vinyl chloride in water at Camp Lejeune, N.C. Epidemiological data from outside the Camp Lejeune setting have also shown that occupational exposure to chlorinated solvents (PCE and TCE) in the Camp Lejeune water supply can be associated with breast cancer.

U.S. Marines exposed, along with their families and civilian workers, to PCE or both PCE and TCE–two major contaminants in Camp Lejeune’s drinking water–have increased risks of developing bladder cancer. We used a case-control study design to assess whether residential drinking water exposures at Camp Lejeune are associated with increased male-to-female risk for breast cancer in marines. In other words, individuals from a group with greater exposure to the Lejeune Groundwater showed a higher incidence of breast cancer. The results from the ATSDR study also indicated a correlation between the amount of toxic water exposure at Lejeune and the incidence of breast cancer.

 

What Is The Camp Lejeune Lawsuit Payout Per Person?

 

While settlement payments to victims of Camp Lejeune’s toxic exposure are estimated to total $6.7 billion, individuals filing claims receive anywhere from $25,000 to $1 million and up, depending on the severity of their illnesses. The Camp Lejeune settlement is an amount of financial compensation the legal team and federal Government agreed upon to compensate for illnesses related to exposure to toxic water at Camp Lejeune. The estimates are an unmistakable sign that the Federal Government is ready and willing to fully compensate the victims at Camp Lejeune who bring a valid lawsuit.

Our attorneys are closely monitoring the number of toxic mollusks in the waters, as we think this will affect settlement compensation amounts for all victims. The above amounts are our estimates for average per-victim amounts for the Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Settlement. Camp Lejeune Injury Settlements will depend on the severity of your victim’s injuries, as well as the ability of your Drinking Water Contamination Lawyer to link your injuries or death to the contaminated Lejeune Water. We think cases that include severe medical conditions or deaths due to exposure to Camp Lejeune’s water contaminants could likely bring settlements in the low to mid-six figures, or even high seven figures, depending on the case.

In other words, a disease undisputedly due to a specific cause, in this case, toxins in the water system at Camp Lejeune, may receive a higher settlement. While the amounts listed here are not necessarily representative of what a plaintiff might be awarded in a Camp Lejeune litigation case (remember, there is no guarantee, and we can only assess potential Camp Lejeune payouts based on the water contamination), they do reflect some precedent in settling contaminated cases. Our attorneys believe high-powered law firms will win the most profitable settlements with the financial resources and expertise to bring Camp Lejeune claims before a jury. In addition, the Camp Lejeune Fairness Act is legislation pending in Congress that would permit victims of water pollution from Camp Lejeune to file a lawsuit so they can obtain financial compensation for their damages.

 

Who Qualifies For The Camp Lejeune Lawsuit?

 

The Camp Lejeune Fairness Act is part of the new bill, which allows veterans, families, and workers to make claims for compensation if veterans were exposed to toxic water on the Marine Corps base from 1953 through 1987. According to the Camp Lejeune Justice Act, Marines, their families, and any civilian contractor injured while drinking water at Camp Lejeune should seek compensation through administrative claims and, eventually, litigation.

This recently passed legislation will enable those who suffered the most harm to file claims in federal court, even though they were likely exposed in utero (in their mother’s wombs) to highly cancer-causing chemicals found in the base’s water at any point from August 1953 through December 1987. Under this legislation, any person residing, working, or otherwise exposed to Camp Lejeune drinking water for 30 days or longer between August 1953 and December 1987, would be eligible to file a damage claim.

Like veterans, family members would need to file a claim for damages. They would need to include medical records and evidence that they lived at the base, either at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune or MCAS New River, for a minimum of 30 days from August 1953 through December 1987. To qualify for compensation, an individual must have lived, worked, served, or been present at Camp Lejeune for thirty cumulative days from 1953 through 1987 and became ill with any kind of injury (such as cancer or another illness) due to contaminated Camp Lejeune water. In addition, a new federal law bypasses the North Carolina Repose Rule, allowing victims to sue in federal court if they were exposed to contaminated water at Lejeune, including during pregnancy, for at least 30 days.

If passed, this legislation would permit anyone exposed to Camp Lejeune waters, including those in their wombs, for at least 30 days from August 1, 1953, through December 31, 1987, to file suit in the US District Court for the Eastern District of NC. That language says anyone who can show they were exposed to Camp Lejeune water for at least one month during the time of the contamination (i.e., from 1953 through 1987) would qualify to file a lawsuit under the law Congress passed. However, there is still one hurdle for Camp Lejeune Water Contamination victims who want to file a claim under the CLJA. The Camp Lejeune Water Contamination would have to submit documents showing they lived or worked there for 30 days or more from 1953 through 1987.

 

What Is The Camp Lejeune Justice Act?

 

The Justice at Camp Lejeune bill is about to become federal law, a renewal that will benefit veterans and families harmed by toxic chemicals exposure to the drinking water at the Marine Corps base at Camp Lejeune, N.C. The Camp Lejeune Justice Act would set a two-year period starting on the date the legislation is signed into law, in which veterans, their families, and others to toxic water at Camp Lejeune can file lawsuits. Additionally, it has a clause known as the 2022 Camp Lejeune Justice Act, which allows individuals affected by contaminated Camp Lejeune water to bring a federal lawsuit seeking damages for things including misery and anguish, lost earnings, and medical expenses. Finally, the Honor, Our PACT Act addresses the contaminated Camp Lejeune Water (CLCW) issue and provides a pathway for justice to marines and others at the base affected by CLCW.

If the Senate passes, the Honoring Our PACT Act will head to President Biden for his final signature to become law. If the Senate passes the bill, then it will only remain to get President Biden’s signature to make it into law. Bipartisan support for the Honoring, Our PACT Act is strong both in the House of Representatives (where it has passed twice) and in the Senate. On August 10, 2022, The Honoring Our Promises to Combat Toxics Together Act (PACT) was signed into law.

On August 10, 2022, US President Joe Biden signed into law the PACT Act, a bill offering millions of veterans and their families the most significant increases in essential health and disability benefits in over three decades. The legislation provides expanded access to medical and disability benefits to veterans who have been injured from specific toxic exposures. Nearly 40 years since the facility’s last recorded instance of water contamination, the new Camp Lejeune law acknowledges multiple chronic illnesses and allows veterans suffering from associated conditions to file claims. Recently, Congress passed the Camp Lejeune Fairness Act of 2022, which allows veterans, their families, and others who were stationed, employed, or resided at the base between August 1953 and December 1987, and suffered injuries as a result of exposure to the contaminated waters, can bring a lawsuit seeking monetary compensation.

WASHINGTON, June 16, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Today, the United States Senate voted to enact the Camp Lejeune Justice Act, a bipartisan Federal mandate that provides former residents of Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, the US Government and their families, to file suits seeking financial compensation from the US Government. Since 2008, Ed Bell, with Bell Law Group, located in South Carolina, has worked tirelessly to lead the latest efforts to seek justice for the water contamination issue at Marine Corps Base. The legislation proposed corrects unjust legal barriers unique to the families of Marines deployed at Camp Lejeune, stemming from a quirk of how North Carolina laws are applied by the Federal Court System, creating a new Cause of Action for individuals exposed to CCW.

Due to a murky North Carolina law implementing a stringent 10-year bar for filing claims Stringent 10-year bar for filing, claims Thousands of affected individuals were formerly prohibited from filing lawsuits under the law. Non-military exposed victims are prohibited by law from filing claims because a North Carolina law bars civil actions in which a defendant’s most recent action or omission is more than ten (10). Now, individuals suffering from, or having suffered from, any of the alleged conditions due to exposure are eligible to file claims through the court system. In addition, the United States Government is prohibited from claiming specified immunity.

Fourth, the Honor Our PACT Act requires that all suits be filed solely in federal court in the Eastern District of North Carolina, potentially creating a very large caseload for that district. Third, The Honoring Our PACT Act eliminates government immunity, which normally applies to injuries and damages suffered by Armed Forces members during their active service. Finally, the Janey Ensminger Act does justice for those that served by eliminating the current legal barriers.

They will now have a way to pursue justice thanks to the PACT Act, explained Ricky A. LeBlanc, managing attorney of Sokolove Law, a nationwide personal injury law firm. Thanks to the PACT Act, Camp Lejeune veterans and their families facing severe medical problems–including multiple types of cancer, neurobehavioral disabilities, heart conditions, female infertility, and congenital disabilities–may be able to pursue the compensation that was previously denied to them for their suffering. A VA spokeswoman confirmed that people wanting to be compensated under the PACT Act based on their exposure to Camp Lejeune’s contaminated water would not see their VA benefits reduced due to any additional cash compensation awarded by a court. For Camp Lejeune’s contaminated water victims, our injury attorneys have clarified that “this means that you or your loved one is now eligible to pursue claims for damages,” in addition to VA-provided health benefits. 

The 2022 Camp Lejeune Fairness Act is part of a far more comprehensive legislation called the Honoring Our PACT Act, which provides veterans with expanded benefits and health care for veterans injured from toxic exposures while serving in the military worldwide. In addition, the Camp Lejeune Justice Act allows individuals to file a lawsuit against the federal Government for possibly exposing about 900,000 people — from 1953 through 1987 — to the worst pollution in the nation’s water supply system in American history. 

 

What Are The Attorney Fees For Camp Lejeune Lawsuits?

 

The trial lawyers in our network work on a contingency fee basis, so they are only paid if you win damages in a Camp Lejeune suit. Our attorneys fight for you with a 33% contingency fee, unlike many attorneys charging 40%.

The contingency fee agreement guarantees that you pay no up-front fees until our injury attorneys have either reached a settlement for Camp Lejeune on your behalf or won your case in court. There is no fee or obligation to talk to a Camp Lejeune toxic water litigation lawyer. You will not owe anything unless you reach a successful result.

Contact the attorneys at OConnor and Partners PLLC, a Camp Lejeune toxic water lawsuit lawyer, if you are owed money due to the Camp Lejeune Water Contamination and whether or not you may recover potential compensation. The sooner you contact a knowledgeable lawyer, the faster the Kryder Law Group can begin working on your case. Contact our highly skilled Water Contamination Lawyers focused on the Camp Lejeune lawsuits to file a claim and collect compensation.

Suppose you have suffered injury and loss because of the contaminated waters on the Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune. In that case, you should select a knowledgeable lawyer or law firm that has the financial resources and expertise to handle any size of a claim. In addition, if your spouse died due to health conditions related to toxic chemicals in contaminated drinking water, you also might have grounds for a wrongful death lawsuit. 

Our attorneys are monitoring the information about toxic mollusks in the waters very closely, as we think this will affect settlement amounts of compensation to all victims. In addition, our lawyers know that the Federal Government’s lawsuit against Camp Lejeune is the same Government that has specifically written legislation allowing victims to file for compensation.

 

Wrongful Death Information

What is the statute of limitations on wrongful death? 

Having a loved one die in a preventable accident can be tremendously upsetting. Depending on the particulars of that case, it is possible that a lawsuit regarding the death could be filed.

You will want to find an attorney familiar with wrongful death statutes in the state where the accident occurred and someone who can walk you through all aspects of the case. Losing your loved one is in and of itself not grounds for filing a wrongful death suit. Instead, you need to prove that another party was responsible for an injury or illness that contributed to his death. When a loved one pays the ultimate price because of the carelessness of another, you are not alone.

You deserve to have the support provided by a lawyer who cares about your family’s future and the challenges that lie ahead. Waiting too long is not only running the risk of having your entire claim denied. You are also delaying justice for yourself and those you love.

Unfortunately, there is no turning the clock back to reverse this terrible incident. However, you can help your family to keep moving forward and to make it through this chapter more easily. Coping with heartache and overwhelm by knowing that somebody’s actions caused it is devastating. But, when you act, the law may side with you, giving you a chance for financial support via a wrongful death lawsuit.

What is the statute of limitations?

Statutes of limitations are created in every state, and they state precisely how long it takes for the surviving family members and other related parties to bring an action related to the death. This is usually two years from the death of the decedent. However, this time frame may be extended or reduced depending on specific circumstances. For instance, if it is claimed a government department caused the unlawful death, the time frame may be shorter, for example, as little as six months from the accident’s date. 

If you think that you have grounds for filing a lawsuit based on the death, it is in your best interest to set up a consultation with a knowledgeable lawyer as soon as possible. Only an attorney can tell you more about whether your case qualifies under relevant wrongful death statutes, and they can counsel you on the next steps should you decide to proceed. A lawyer is a very valuable support system. If you are unsure if you have grounds to bring the case, consult an experienced attorney immediately.

Meeting with an attorney does not commit you to filing an immediate case, but it gives you the best chance of getting the necessary support. Meeting with a lawyer right away gives you the best possible chance of getting the support that your claim needs and clarity about how the court process looks. While it is possible that your case will resolve out of court through settlement negotiation, your attorney can also talk to you more about what time frame is expected should your case actually reach trial. There are a lot of different factors in these scenarios that could affect your case, but at least you will know what to expect.

A lawyer will walk you through it from the day after an accident until the end of your case, whatever that looks like. You can do much to bolster your needs by finding a lawyer with a great deal of wrongful death experience in the state where the death occurred. The wrongful death statute of limitations is just one aspect of your whole case, and you want an experienced trial attorney to help you and your family navigate this challenging time. In addition, other laws and rules are related explicitly to wrongful death.

A sudden death leaves the family members who survived emotionally and financially devastated. This means these individuals must educate themselves on their rights and get ready to use them as soon as possible. Specific state statutes govern what it means to say something is wrongful death. Wrongful death is different from personal injury law.

Personal injury law covers situations where a slip-and-fall incident or car crash may have injured an individual. Wrongful death litigation, however, is a different matter and requires an attorney with extensive experience operating his or her practice under that umbrella. Wrongful death is used to explain unnatural or premature death caused by illegal or negligent actions of a person. In addition, it involves the potential of civil lawsuits seeking monetary damages for the surviving family members because their lives would have been changed forever by losing their loved ones.

Wrongful death is also a concept within the scope of civil law, though when a loved one dies, a separate wrongful death criminal case can arise, handled by authorities. For example, imagine your loved one being killed in a drunk-driving crash. Police and other authorities may file a separate criminal lawsuit against the person who caused the drunk driving crash, but this does not mean you would get compensation from this suit alone. It might affect in some ways the outcome of a civil law case on your case, but this is handled separately and has different statutes and implications.

A civil suit may also be brought even if, currently, criminal charges are pending against a defendant on the same issues. In addition, wrongful death cases brought at the civil level may be brought at, during, or after the prosecution of the criminal case. These are separate proceedings, and their outcomes are entirely independent. Even in cases where the individual is acquitted of criminal offenses for the circumstances, it is still possible that civil damages can be recovered. 

What are the legal justifications for a wrongful death claim?

 

The wrongful death lawsuit can be filed in several different types of cases. These include any case in which an individual, government entity, or business directly contributed to or caused non-natural death. Some more common causes include dangerous construction, faulty products, dangerous drugs, driving while impaired, medical neglect, careless or reckless conduct, abuse in nursing homes, unsafe medical devices, criminal acts, intentional homicide, or the unintentional serving of alcohol.

Wrongful death lawsuits may be predicated on the fact that a defendant’s harmful activities or products caused the death of another party in almost every instance. Regarding wrongful death cases, every state has its own rules. No common law foundation exists for wrongful death claims. As a result, each state has individual laws defining who can file a claim for wrongful death, how long the surviving party has to do so, the types of damages that can be collected, and who is eligible to receive the settlement money. In most states, the beneficiaries of a wrongful death lawsuit are the deceased’s spouse, children, and, if none of those parties are still alive, the estate administrators. If there is no surviving wife or children, the beneficiaries are the deceased’s children.

The process of pursuing a wrongful death claim can be daunting and frustrating for the family members who are just attempting to move on with their life and try to put that part behind them.

If you are unsure whether you are eligible for compensation under the criteria listed above, contact our attorneys by calling (866) 240-2414 for a free, no-obligation case evaluation to learn more about your claim.

 

Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Lawsuit FAQs

 

 

What Diseases Are Associated With Camp Lejeune Water Contamination?

According to researchers, contaminated water from Camp Lejeune could increase the risk of bladder cancer in people exposed to it. Bladder cancer is a disease where malignant (cancer-like) cells develop in the tissue of your bladder.

There are certain risk factors common in many people. These include age, gender, smoking, and exposure to environmental toxins.

Bladder cancer is most prevalent among older adults because their bodies have developed abnormalities in their cells for a long time. While there is no single, definitive cure for bladder cancer, detection and treatment early on may increase the chances of recovery and decrease symptoms. In addition, high-risk individuals for bladder cancer may want to actively manage their health, make lifestyle changes, and get regular screenings.

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer linked to the Lejeune Water Contamination. Studies show women exposed to Camp Lejeune’s contaminated water are at much higher risk for developing breast cancer compared with non-exposed women.

There are many possible explanations for this increased risk. One theory is that contaminants in water may disturb normal functions in the breasts and raise cancer risks. Another view is that contaminants may damage DNA, which could then cause cancer.

Women need to be aware of a lot of signs when it comes to breast cancer. These include breast size or shape changes, skin texture, lumps on breasts, and nipple drainage. You must see a physician if you discover any of these symptoms.

A type of cancer associated with exposure to poisoned water at Camp Lejeune is cervical cancer. The tissue of the cervix is where this type of cancer grows. Human papillomavirus is a virus that causes cervical Cancer (HPV). According to investigators, drinking tainted water from Camp Lejeune could expose women to HPV, increasing their risk of cervical cancer.

A multitude of symptoms accompanies cervical cancer. These include pain during sexual activity, bleeding during periods, and following sex.

This specific type of cancer starts in your esophagus. Only 1% of all cancers diagnosed annually in the United States are esophageal, making them comparatively uncommon. Sadly, this type of cancer is among the deadliest, with only a five-year survival rate of around 20%. This is because cancer is frequently not discovered until after it has spread to other body parts. Esophageal cancer symptoms include difficulty swallowing, weight loss, and back or throat pain.

Contaminated water from Camp Lejeune could increase your risk for esophageal cancer by damaging DNA from cells in your esophagus.

Your kidneys’ cells are where kidney cancer first develops, but it can spread to other body regions. A pair of organs called the kidneys filter waste from your blood and expelled it from your body.

Contaminated water has been linked to increased risks of kidney cancer. This is because of the effects of chemicals such as benzene and trichloroethylene. The chances are highest in those exposed to the water over long periods.

Symptoms of kidney cancer include blood in urine, pain down the sides, and a bulky mass in the abdomen. If you determine that blood is in your urine, you must seek medical attention immediately.

The contaminated water from Camp Lejeune has also been linked to increased risks for liver cancer. The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) found that men exposed to contaminated water at Camp Lejeune were two times more likely to develop liver cancer than men who were not exposed. In addition, most experts suspect that dirty water could increase cancer risk, exposing individuals to chemicals such as benzene and trichloroethylene. These chemicals may damage DNA and cause cancer.

There are many symptoms associated with liver cancer. These include weight loss, fatigue, abdominal pain, and jaundice.

The risk of developing non-Hodgkins lymphoma was found to be twice as high in people drinking the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune. Cancer starts in cells in the lymph system, part of the body’s immune system. Symptoms of non-Hodgkins lymphoma may include swelling in the lymph glands, fatigue, fever, and weight loss. In addition, the contaminated water from Camp Lejeune has elements that can create a toxic environment inside your body and suppress your immune system.

It’s crucial that you have an expert medical look at your symptoms if you experience these symptoms. Early detection is essential to treat this kind of cancer successfully. Adult leukemia is an abnormal growth of blood cells in your bone marrow. It can suck up healthy blood cells and cause severe health problems.

People exposed to the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune have been found to have an increased likelihood of developing adult leukemia. Symptoms of adult leukemia may include fatigue, fever, weight loss, and easily bruised or bleeding. Most adults with adult leukemia will need chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

The water on Camp Lejeune is contaminated, containing benzene, a known carcinogen linked to leukemia. If you are exposed to contaminated water, Discussing your risk of leukemia with your healthcare professional is crucial. In addition, chemicals in Camp Lejeune’s water were linked to aplastic anemia, a condition where your body does not make enough new blood cells. Risk factors for aplastic anemia include exposure to chemicals such as benzene and trichloroethylene.

Symptoms of aplastic anemia may include tiredness, shortness of breath, and easily bruised or bleeding. The treatment for aplastic anemia is bone marrow transplantation. The symptoms may be mild or severe and may appear suddenly or gradually.

In one research study, the risk for aplastic anemia increased among those exposed to the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune. The incidence of this cancer increased by 56 percent in people exposed to Camp Lejeune’s water contamination. This cancer attacks the bone marrow plasma cells and causes problems in blood cell production.

Multiple myeloma is difficult to diagnose early on, as it shares symptoms with other diseases. These may include fatigue, bone pain or fractures, frequent infections, nausea, and anemia. The exact cause of multiple myeloma is unknown but is thought to result from environmental and genetic factors. Another common symptom among those exposed to the contaminated water at Camp Lejeune is renal toxicity.

Renal toxicity is damage to the kidneys, which may result in renal failure. Some symptoms associated with renal toxicity include changes in urine, frequent urination, blood in the urine, swelling of feet, ankles, or legs, nausea, and weakness. This condition can be severe, and you must get medical help immediately especially if you’ve been exposed to the toxic water at Camp Lejeune between 1953 and 1987. Scleroderma is a condition that results in the thickening and hardening of your skin.

It may also affect tissues and organs within the body, including your lungs, heart, and kidneys. The symptoms of scleroderma differ depending on which organs are affected. Skin symptoms include hardened, thickened skin, itching, burning, or swelling, and the Raynauds phenomenon (reduced blood flow to extremities). When scleroderma involves the internal organs, it can cause shortness of breath, heartburn, swelling in arms and legs, fatigue, and numbness or tingling of fingers and toes.

There is no cure for scleroderma, but treatments are available to help manage symptoms. Although scleroderma’s exact causes are still unknown, it is thought to be related to overactive immune systems and contaminated water.

One of the more common symptoms associated with Camp Lejeune water contamination is liver steatosis, more commonly known as fatty liver disease. This condition occurs when there is an accumulation of fat within the cells of your liver. Symptoms of liver steatosis may include tiredness, weight loss, and upper-right abdominal pain.

Fatty liver can sometimes lead to more severe conditions, such as cirrhosis or liver cancer. Therefore, treatment of liver steatosis usually involves lifestyle changes, such as diet and exercise. In some cases, medications may be needed to manage symptoms.

The increased risk for female infertility has also been linked to contaminated Camp Lejeune waters. Infertility is an inability to become pregnant after a year of exposure to unprotected sex. Several elements might contribute to infertility, and it is usually a complicated condition without a single, definite cause. However, exposure to certain chemicals has been linked to increased infertility risk for women, and contamination in Camp Lejeune’s water is thought to play a part. It is a severe condition that could profoundly affect a woman’s life.

If you believe that you may have come into contact with the contaminated water on Camp Lejeune, you must talk to your doctor about your choices for becoming pregnant.

What Contaminated The Water at Camp Lejeune?

What Are The Attorney Fees For Camp Lejeune Lawsuits?

The attorneys in our national group work on a contingency fee basis, so they are only paid if you win damages in a Camp Lejeune suit. Our attorneys have a 33% contingency fee for Camp Lejeune claims, unlike many firms charging 40% to victims.

The contingency fee agreement guarantees that you pay no up-front fees until our personal injury attorneys have reached a settlement for Camp Lejeune on your behalf or won your case in court. There is no fee or obligation to talk to a Camp Lejeune toxic water litigation lawyer, and your lawsuit will be handled on a contingency basis, meaning you will not owe anything unless you reach a successful result.

Contact our Camp Lejeune toxic water lawsuit lawyers if you are owed money due to the Camp Lejeune Water Contamination and whether or not you may recover potential compensation. The sooner you contact our team of knowledgeable lawyers, the faster we can begin working on your case. If you are still wondering whether or not you will be able to make a lawsuit and receive damages, you should contact us by calling (866) 240-2414. Highly skilled water contamination lawyers that have handled hundreds of Camp Lejeune lawsuit claims are ready to fight for you

What Is The Camp Lejeune Justice Act?

The Justice at Camp Lejeune bill has become federal law, a renewal that will benefit veterans and families harmed by toxic chemicals exposure to the drinking water at Camp Lejeune, N.C. The Camp Lejeune Justice Act would set two years starting when the legislation is signed into law, in which veterans, their families, and others at Camp Lejeune, people who were poisoned by tainted drinking water may file complaints. can file lawsuits. It also includes a provision known as the 2022 Camp Lejeune Justice Act, which allows individuals affected by contaminated Camp Lejeune water to bring a federal lawsuit seeking damages for medical expenses, lost wages, and pain and suffering. In addition, the Honor, Our PACT Act addresses the contaminated Camp Lejeune Water (CLCW) issue. It provides a pathway for justice to marines and others at the base affected by CLCW.

Our PACT Act is strong both in the House of Representatives (where it has passed twice) and in the Senate. On August 10, 2022, The Honoring Our Promises to Combat Toxics Together Act (PACT) was signed into law.

On August 10, 2022, U.S. President Joe Biden signed the PACT Act, a bill offering millions of veterans and their families the most significant increases in essential health and disability benefits over three decades. The legislation provides expanded access to medical and disability benefits to veterans who have been injured from specific toxic exposures. In addition, nearly 40 years since the facility’s last recorded instance of water contamination, the new Camp Lejeune law acknowledges multiple chronic illnesses. It allows veterans suffering from associated conditions to file claims. Recently, Congress passed the Camp Lejeune Fairness Act of 2022, which will enable veterans, their families, and others who were stationed, worked or lived on the Marine Corps Base at Camp Lejeune, N.C., for at least thirty (30) days between August 1, 1953. December 31, 1987, suffered injuries from exposure to the contaminated waters, which can bring a lawsuit seeking monetary compensation.

On June 16, 2022, the US Senate voted to enact the Camp Lejeune Justice Act, a bipartisan Federal mandate that offers services to former Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base occupants, the United States Government, and their families, to file suits asking the American government for financial reparations. The legislation proposed corrects unjust legal barriers unique to the families of Marines deployed at Camp Lejeune, stemming from a quirk of how North Carolina laws are applied by the Federal Court System, establishing a new Federal Cause of Action for those who have been subjected to CCW.

Due to a murky North Carolina law implementing a stringent 10-year bar for filing claims Stringent 10-year bar for filing, claims Thousands of affected individuals were formerly prohibited from filing lawsuits under the law. Non-military exposed victims are not permitted by law from filing claims because a North Carolina law bars civil actions in which a defendant’s most recent act or omission is more than ten (10). Now, individuals suffering from, or having suffered from, any of the alleged conditions due to exposure are eligible to file claims through the court system. In addition, the United States Government is prohibited from claiming specified immunity.

Fourth, the Honor Our PACT Act requires that all suits be filed solely in federal court in the Eastern District of North Carolina, potentially creating a massive caseload for that district. Third, The Honoring Our PACT Act eliminates government immunity, which generally applies to injuries and damages suffered by Armed Forces members during their active service. Finally, the Janey Ensminger Act does justice for those served by eliminating the current legal barriers.

They will now have a way to pursue justice thanks to the PACT Act, explained a top-rated trial lawyer and member of the Get Paid More nationwide network of trial lawyers. Thanks to the PACT Act, Camp Lejeune veterans and their families facing severe medical problems–including multiple types of cancer, neurobehavioral disabilities, heart conditions, female infertility, and congenital disabilities–may be able to pursue the compensation that was previously denied to them for their suffering. A VA spokeswoman confirmed that individuals seeking compensation under the PACT Act based on their exposure to Camp Lejeune’s contaminated water would not see their VA benefits reduced due to any additional cash compensation awarded by a court. For Camp Lejeune water contamination victims, our injury attorneys will fight to assist you or your loved one to get more compensation because Veterans are now eligible to pursue claims for damages in addition to VA-provided health benefits.

The 2022 Camp Lejeune Fairness Act is part of a far more comprehensive legislation called the Honoring Our PACT Act, which provides veterans with expanded benefits and health care for veterans injured from toxic exposures while serving in the military worldwide. In addition, the Camp Lejeune Justice Act allows individuals to file a lawsuit against the federal government for possibly exposing about 900,000 people — from 1953 through 1987 — to the worst pollution in the nation’s water supply system in American history.

What Is The Camp Lejeune Lawsuit Payout Per Person?

Who Qualifies For The Camp Lejeune Lawsuit?

Who Are The Best Lawyers For Camp Lejeune Lawsuits?

What Types of Cancer Did Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Cause?

According to a formal government report released Wednesday, people deployed at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina when water was contaminated were more likely to die from multiple types of cancer, along with Lou Gehrig’s disease. Exposure to contaminated water is a significant health hazard, especially when it involves chemicals that can cause cancer, such as the chemicals involved at the US Marine Corps base Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, NC. Researchers linked higher mortality rates for at least twelve types of cancers specifically to contaminated water exposures at Camp Lejeune, according to the ASTDR study.

Scientific studies conducted by public health agencies found that Camp Lejeune residents and employees exposed to the contaminated water had substantially higher risks of developing lung cancer and dying of lung cancer than the control group. Males who were exposed to tainted water at Camp Lejeune had a twofold increased risk of developing liver cancer compared to men who were not exposed, according to ATSDR. In addition to kidney cancer and diseases, ATSDRs research found compelling evidence indicating that contaminated Camp Lejeune drinking water was associated with increased risks for bladder cancer.

The ASTDR studies also found a specific increased risk for kidney cancer, liver cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, and multiple myeloma, among others. The study also found that contaminated water exposure does not just lead to kidney cancer; it leads to other chronic kidney diseases.

Exposure to PCE and TCE chemicals was linked to a higher risk of kidney cancer and other illnesses in addition to bladder cancer. TCE is a known carcinogen most strongly associated with kidney cancer. Perchloroethylene (PCE) compounds are also linked to liver cancer by numerous studies.

Several toxic chemicals that can cause cancer include known carcinogens trichloroethylene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), tetrachloroethene, vinyl chloride, and benzene. Toxic chemicals have horrible health effects, like bladder cancer and liver disease. Cancer-causing chemicals lead to severe health problems for exposed individuals, including cancers (liver and bladder), abortions, and congenital disabilities.

The risk of lung cancer increases with exposure to some chemicals, including benzene. Exposure to these chemicals does not imply that someone will inevitably develop cancer, but the risk increases the more frequently, the more, and how much an individual is exposed.

Dangerous chemicals include benzene, industrial solvents, and others, the Department of Veterans Affairs claims (VA), and many have been linked to cancer, including liver cancer. In their landmark report about the health risks associated with the water contamination of the Marine Corps base Camp Lejeune, the ATSDR included liver cancer among the 16 diseases directly linked to the contaminants.

The study objective was to determine if possible exposure to Camp Lejeune water contamination was associated with increased risks for specific types of cancers and other chronic diseases in civilian workers employed on the base. Results from the study on smoky-related reason of mortality, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart disease, and stomach cancer, indicated that smoking only marginally increased the risk for any associations between causes of death and exposures to drinking water contaminants at Camp Lejeune.

These causes of death were included to evaluate any effect smoking might have had on the findings. Causes of death were selected from literature reviews conducted by the US (IARC), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Toxicology Program (NTP), and the (ATSDR). In addition, certain medical conditions were also identified by the Public Health Service, US Department of Health, & (ATSDR) as being supported by enough evidence, or supported by sufficient studies, to attribute a medical condition to exposure to toxic chemicals found at Camp Lejeune.

Several case-control studies and ecologic studies suggest a connection between Camp Lejeune’s water supply contaminants and many different types of cancer. Although one survey by ATSDR identified prostate cancer as one of the types of cancers linked to contaminated water, many Camp Lejeune attorneys are dismissing the cases. One study found that US marines serving at Camp Lejeune between 1975 and 1985 had a 10% higher risk of dying of any cancer than US marines doing at Camp Pendleton. At this military base, there was no contaminated water.

The study found more than 150 had about a 10 % higher risk of dying from cancer than the 150 who served at Camp Pendleton in California. For those in the study with the most significant exposure to the toxicants — that is, those who worked or lived on Camp Lejeune the longest — the death rate from kidney cancer was 41 times higher compared with a control group. When the exposure to higher levels in the civilian workforce at Camp Lejeune was compared with that in Camp Lejeune workers who had lower exposure, higher cumulative exposures to contaminants were associated with increased risks for kidney, esophagus, prostate, and rectal cancers, leukemia, and Parkinson’s disease.

Studies conducted outside Camp Lejeune have also shown associations between breast cancer and occupational exposures to industrial solvent types (PCE and TCE) found in the Camp Lejeunes water supply. Several scientific studies were conducted with factory workers and others exposed to PCE, all indicating a positive correlation between PCE and the diagnosis of bladder cancer.

The National Research Council assembled a multidisciplinary panel consisting of environmental scientists, toxicologists, epidemiologists, and biostatisticians to examine the scientific evidence linking negative health implications with historical data of exposures to contaminated drinking water on Camp Lejeune, during pregnancy, in infancy, and adulthood. Medical and scientific evidence has linked contaminated drinking water with pediatric cancers, bladder cancers, multiple myeloma, liver cancers, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, congenital disabilities, and other severe health conditions. Conversely, the most prevalent diseases associated with contaminated healthy water are liver cancer, liver damage, reproductive problems, and congenital disabilities. Sometimes, drinking contaminated water over an extended period causes blood and digestive cancer.

Is Breast Cancer Linked To Camp Lejeune Toxic Water?

Is Prostate Cancer a Disease Caused By The Water at Camp Lejeune?

Did Contaminated Water at Camp Lejeune Cause My Lung Cancer Di?e

Are Family Members Eligible For Compensation If They Got Sick From Water Contamination At Camp Lejeune?

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Can I File a Lawsuit If A Family Member Who Was Stationed at Camp Lejeune Passed Away From Cancer?

Is Parkinson's Disease Caused By Water That Was Contaminated At Camp Lejeune?

Is Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma Linked To Camp Lejeune?

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What Cancers Are Covered Under Camp Lejeune Water Contamination?

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What Are The Camp Lejeune Presumptive Conditions?

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Do I Need An Attorney For Camp Lejeune Lawsuit?

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What Is The Average Payout For Camp Lejeune Lawsuit?

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How Long Will It Take To Get a Camp Lejeune Settlement?

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Who Qualifies For The Camp Lejeune Lawsuit?

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Has The Camp Lejeune Lawsuit Been Settled?

Which Veterans' Benefits Are Offered to Camp Lejeune Victims?

Will Suing Have An Impact On My VA Benefits For Camp Lejeune Water?

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